DIY Friday: It’s time to start thinking about those Springtime gardening chores!

With the beginning of spring-like weather (so today may not be the best example of that type of weather!) many of you may be starting to get excited about  another season of gardening.  For those of you that are considering selling your home this spring, it is a fantastic idea to get out there as early as possible and get that outside looking good!

So, you may ask, what can be done this early in the season? Check out this list of chores that can safely and easily be done – happy gardening!

Springtime gardening

 DIY: Springtime Gardening Chores

 

  1. Prune summer-flowering shrubs.  You want to avoid wasting potential blossoms so it is important to have the first big surge of spring growth going into productive (new) wood.
  2. Now is when you should cut back your ornamental grasses.
  3. Patch punctured rubber hoses and place any irrigation hoses you may be planning to use in the garden now before perennial plants and groundcover begin growing.
  4. Check out plant supports and make sure to fix any that were damaged over the winter.
  5. Clean up any branches or other debris that collected over the winter.
  6. Have your tools ready to go, take the lawn mower blades to a professional sharpening service, clean cutting blades of pruners and brush out any remaining soil from containers and clean thoroughly.
  7. As soon as the earth is firm, remove leaf debris and light thatch from all lawn areas.  Be careful to not do this too early as you may end up pulling up tender plant shoots, leaving bare soil exposed and a safe haven for weeds to germinate.
  8. Add some bird-feeders in the yard.
  9. Start planning for any changes that you want to make in your garden this season.  Where were the problem spots last season, do you need to divide or move any perennials?  If you’re in the GTA and looking for some help check out Patina and Company, they have great advice and ideas.
  10. Look through your garden for any plants that have been pushed up by the frost and firmly push the roots back into the soil.

Comments

  1. Beth Knapp says:

    I love your stone pathway, but what do you use around the pathway. I have several walking ground covers I like, but my area is shade. We live in Saint Louis, Missouri. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Speak Your Mind

*